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Idiomatic Vocabulary

This section gives some idiomatic vocabulary in English, as a blog, or list to which I regularly add. This vocabulary is also given (in more detail) in the page ‘Idiomatic Vocabulary’ (under the ‘Vocabulary’ Section). So, you have the same input twice, since both forms can be convenient. However, if you are accessing the information here, it is… Read More »

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Cultural Insights to Australia

Hello Everyone. In the ‘IELTS Vocabulary’ section, I mentioned seven rules to learning vocabulary. Rule 7 is by reading. And here is some light, easy, and interesting reading pieces – all about … the country shown below.   Yes, Australia. My country is huge, diverse, and has a fascinating history, which all means there are many insights I… Read More »

Idiomatic Vocabulary for IELTS (22 of 25): Nature calls!

  Every language has phrases and sentences that cannot be understood by just knowing the individual words. This is known as idiomatic language, and it is a very important part of any language, including English, and is very useful for IELTS speaking. Here’s an example. To answer the call of nature This is a indirect and idiomatic way to say, ‘Go to the toilet’. Incidentally, many Americans may even find ‘go to the toilet’ too direct, and prefer, ‘Go to the restroom’. Women might say, ‘I’m just going to powder my nose.’ But here I’ll go for the more scientific, ‘to answer the call of nature’.In fact, even in America, some people might say, ‘Nature calls’ when wanting to go to the toilet. …

Hey, I want to promote my school! // Please recommend me to anyone you know!

Hi everyone.  January is coming, which is normally the least active time in the demand for IELTS preparation. In addition, COVID-19 doesn’t appear to be getting better – in fact, it seems to be getting worse, and this has severely affected the motivation for people for foreign study. And there are other factors (which I’d rather not mention) affecting business. The result: I need students right now. Look at the above photo. I have shown this before, because the student next to me (Jasmine) got … IELTS 9 for reading …

Idiomatic Vocabulary for IELTS (20 of 25): “Learn it from scratch, right?”

    Every language has phrases and sentences that cannot be understood by just knowing the individual words. This is known as idiomatic language, and it is a very important part of any language, including English, and is very useful for IELTS speaking. Here are some useful examples, which all mean a similar thing. 1.  To be a sharp learning curve …

Idiomatic Vocabulary for IELTS (18 of 25): “Don’t turn your nose up at this!”

  Every language has phrases and sentences that cannot be understood by just knowing the individual words. This is known as idiomatic language, and it is a very important part of any language, including English, and is very useful for IELTS speaking. Here’s an example. To turn your nose up (at sth.) This is a verb phrase meaning you don’t want to do, use, or accept something kindly offered to you. This is useful for IELTS because people generally try to help others in the world, so not accepting, or not having your offer accepted, can be quite common. Since this usually involves refusing a kind offer, the phrase can be negative. …

Idiomatic Vocabulary for IELTS (17 of 25): A salty idiom!

    Every language has phrases and sentences that cannot be understood by just knowing the individual words. This is known as idiomatic language, and it is a very important part of any language, including English, and is very useful for IELTS speaking. Here’s an example.   …

Idiomatic Vocabulary for IELTS (16 of 25): Let’s talk about drugs.

  Every language has phrases and sentences that cannot be understood by just knowing the individual words. This is known as idiomatic language, and it is a very important part of any language, including English, and is very useful for IELTS speaking. Here’s an example. To be on steroids This is an adjectival phrase meaning extremely developed when compared to something else. Body builders take ‘steroids’ [a hormonal drug’] in order to develop abnormally large muscles. Similarly, when comparing a strong with a weak form, we can consider the strong one to be ‘on steroids’. This is very idiomatic and descriptive (good), but not easy to use (bad). Try inventing some comparison and seeing if you can make these phrase work for you. …

Idiomatic Vocabulary for IELTS (15 of 25): “It’s a jungle out there!”

  Every language has phrases and sentences that cannot be understood by just knowing the individual words. This is known as idiomatic language, and it is a very important part of any language, including English, and is very useful for IELTS speaking. Here are three useful examples, all related to each other. the rat race / concrete jungle (N phrase) dog-eat-dog (adj. phrase) …

Idiomatic Vocabulary for IELTS (13 of 25): “I’m a super-IELTS teacher!”

  Every language has phrases and sentences that cannot be understood by just knowing the individual words. This is known as idiomatic language, and it is a very important part of any language, including English, and is very useful for IELTS speaking. Here’s an example. Super-[adj] This is a prefix which makes the adjective which follows much stronger, and it is useful because it can describe many more extremes of feeling, and has a fun and upbeat feel. It is used as a prefix (meaning ‘more than’) in some formal words, such as… …

Idiomatic Vocabulary for IELTS (11 of 25): “He’s a real nerd!”

    Every language has phrases and sentences that cannot be understood by just knowing the individual words. This is known as idiomatic language, and it is a very important part of any language, including English, and is very useful for IELTS speaking. Here are two useful examples, which mean the same thing. To be a nerd / geek …

Idiomatic Vocabulary for IELTS (9 of 25): ‘Fingers Crossed!’

  Every language has phrases and sentences that cannot be understood by just knowing the individual words. This is known as idiomatic language, and it is a very important part of any language, including English, and is very useful for IELTS speaking. Here are two useful examples, which mean the same thing. Fingers crossed Knock on wood …